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robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:12 pm    Post subject: I AM a Survivor/psychotherapist/author

RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW
ROBERT EGGELTON

www.*.con

411 Pages
Science Fiction/Fantasy

ISBN: 1907133062 / ISBN-13: 9781907133060

Dog Horn Publishing, Leeds, England

To purchase:

hllp*://www.*.con/Rarity-from-the-Hollow-ebook/dp/B007JDI508

hllp*://www.*.con/shop/robert-eggleton/rarity-from-the-hollow/paperback/product-20203207.html

hllp*://www.*.con/books/rarity_from_the_hollow.html

Author proceeds are donated to prevent child abuse in West Virginia.

Review by Adicus Ryan Garton (excerpt as intro), Atomjack Science Fiction Magazine hllp*://*.con/Atomjack/7/current.htm

“Imagine Wizard of Oz and Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy smashed together and taking place in a hollow in the hills of West Virginia. Now you have an idea of what to expect when you sit down to read Rarity From the Hollow….”

…unabashed, unashamed exploration of the life of young Lacy Dawn, as she learns that she is the savior of the universe. The naked, genderless android, Dot-com… Add her abusive father, her weak-willed mother, a sexually-abused ghost for a best friend…trees that talk to her, a dog that can communicate telepathically with cockroaches and so much more.

There is so much to this story, and its writing is so unblinkingly honest…spares us nothing…her father beating her and her mother, the emotions…the dark creeping insanity that eats away at her Iraq-veteran father, and the life in general of people too poor, too uneducated to escape.

In part, it is a grueling exposition of what children endure when …abused. …the only way…to escape is to learn that she is the savior… strong, tough, smart—all those attributes that any child should have—and she reminds us that children are survivors, adaptive and optimistic.

But don't think you're going to be reading something harsh and brutal and tragic. This book is laugh-out-loud funny at times, satiric of almost everything it touches upon…The characters from the hollow and from the planet Shptiludrp (the Mall of the Universe) are funny almost to the point of tears.

...It's absolutely fantastic…."

Adicus Ryan Garton is the editor of the online science fiction magazine Atomjack. He is currently teaching English in South Korea. Email: Adicus Ryan Garton

First Chapter:

Cozy in Cardboard

Inside her first clubhouse, Lacy Dawn glanced over fifth grade spelling words for tomorrow’s quiz at school. She already knew all the words in the textbook and most others in any human language.

Nothing’s more important than an education.

The clubhouse was a cardboard box in the front yard that her grandmother's new refrigerator had occupied until an hour before. Her father brought it home for her to play in.

The nicest thing he's ever done.

Faith lay beside her with a hand over the words and split fingers to cheat as they were called off. She lived in the next house up the hollow. Every other Wednesday for the last two months, the supervised child psychologist came to their school, pulled her out of class, and evaluated suspected learning disabilities. Lacy Dawn underlined a word with a fingernail.

All she needs is a little motivation.

Before they had crawled in, Lacy Dawn tapped the upper corner of the box with a flashlight and proclaimed, "The place of all things possible -- especially you passing the fifth grade so we'll be together in the sixth."

Please concentrate, Faith. Try this one.

"Armadillo."

"A, R, M, … A … D, I, L, D, O," Faith demonstrated her intellect.

"That's weak. This is a bonus word so you’ll get extra points. Come on."

Lacy Dawn nodded and looked for a new word.

I’ll trick her by going out of order – a word she can't turn into another punch line.

“Don’t talk about it and the image will go away. Let’s get back to studying,” Lacy Dawn said.

My mommy don't like sex. It's just her job and she told me so.

Faith turned her open spelling book over, which saved its page, and rolled onto her side. Lacy Dawn did the same and snuggled her back against the paper wall. Face to face -- a foot of smoothness between -- they took a break. The outside was outside.

At their parents’ insistence, each wore play clothing -- unisex hand-me-downs that didn’t fit as well as school clothing. They’d been careful not to get muddy before crawling into the box. They’d not played in the creek and both were cleaner than the usual evening. The clubhouse floor remained an open invitation to anybody who had the opportunity to consider relief from daily stressors.

"How'd you get so smart, Lacy Dawn? Your parents are dumb asses just like mine."

"You ain't no dumb ass and you're going to pass the fifth grade."

"Big deal -- I'm still fat and ugly," Faith said.

"I'm doing the best I can. I figure by the time I turn eleven I can fix that too. For now, just concentrate on passing and don't become special education. I need you. You're my best friend."

"Ain't no other girls our age close in the hollow. That's the only reason you like me. Watch out. There's a pincher bug crawling in."

Lacy Dawn sat almost upright because there was not quite enough headroom in the refrigerator box. She scooted the bug out the opening. (delete here for word count) Faith watched the bug attempt re-entry, picked it up, and threw it a yard away into the grass. It didn't get hurt. Lacy Dawn smiled her approval. The new clubhouse was a sacred place where nothing was supposed to hurt.

"Daddy said I can use the tarp whenever he finishes the overhaul on the car in the driveway. That way, our clubhouse will last a long time," Lacy Dawn said.

"Chewy, chewy tootsie roll. Everything in this hollow rots, especially the people. You know that."

"We ain't rotten,” Lacy Dawn gestured with open palms. “There are a lot of good things here -- like all the beautiful flowers. Just focus on your spelling and I'll fix everything else. This time I want a 100% and a good letter to your mommy."

"She won't read it," Faith said.

"Yes she will. She loves you and it'll make her feel good. Besides, she has to or the teacher will call Welfare. Your daddy would be investigated -- unless you do decide to become special education. That's how parents get out of it. The kid lets them off the hook by deciding to become a SPED. Then there ain't nothing Welfare can do about it because the kid is the problem and not the parents."

"I ain't got no problems," Faith said.

"Then pass this spelling test."

"I thought if I messed up long enough, eventually somebody would help me out. I just need a place to live where people don't argue all the time. That ain't much."

"Maybe you are a SPED. There's always an argument in a family. Pass the test you retard," Lacy Dawn opened her spelling book.

Faith flipped her book over too, rolled onto her stomach and looked at the spelling words. Lacy Dawn handed her the flashlight because it was getting dark and grinned when Faith’s lips started moving as she memorized. Faith noticed and clamped her lips shut between thumb and index finger.

This is boring. I learned all these words last year.

"Don't use up the batteries or Daddy will know I took it," Lacy Dawn said.

"Alright -- I'll pass the quiz, but just 'cause you told me to. This is a gamble and you'd better come through if it backfires. Ain't nothing wrong with being a SPED. The work is easier and the teacher lets you do puzzles."

"You're my best friend," Lacy Dawn closed the book.

They rolled back on their sides to enjoy the smoothness. The cricket chorus echoed throughout the hollow and the frogs peeped. An ant attempted entry but changed its direction before either rescued it. Unnoticed, Lacy Dawn's father threw the tarp over the box and slid in the trouble light. It was still on and hot. The bulb burned Lacy Dawn's calf.

He didn't mean to hurt me -- the second nicest thing he's ever done.

"Test?" Lacy Dawn announced with the better light, and called off, "Poverty."

"I love you," Faith responded.

"Me too, but spell the word."

"P is for poor. O is for oranges from the Salvation Army Christmas basket. V is for varicose veins that Mommy has from getting pregnant every year. E is for everybody messes up sometimes -- sorry. R is for I'm always right about everything except when you tell me I'm wrong -- like now. T is for it’s too late for me to pass no matter what we do and Y is for you know it too."

"Faith, it's almost dark! Go home before your mommy worries," Lacy Dawn's mother yelled from the front porch and stepped back into the house to finish supper. The engine of the VW in the driveway cranked but wouldn't start. It turned slower as its battery died, too.

Faith slid out of the box with her spelling book in-hand. She farted from the effort. A clean breeze away, she squished a mosquito that had landed on her elbow and watched Lacy Dawn hold her breath as she scooted out of the clubhouse, pinching her nose with fingers of one hand, holding the trouble light with the other, and pushing her spelling book forward with her knees. The moon was almost full. There would be plenty of light to watch Faith walk up the gravel road. Outside the clubhouse, they stood face to face and ready to hug. It lasted a lightning bug statement until adult intrusion.

"Give it back. This thing won't start," Lacy Dawn’s father grabbed the trouble light out of her hand and walked away.

"All we ever have is beans for supper. Sorry about the fart."

"Don't complain. Complaining is like sitting in a rocking chair. You can get lots of motion but you ain't going anywhere," Lacy Dawn said.

"Why didn't you tell me that last year?” Faith asked. “I've wasted a lot of time."

"I just now figured it out. Sorry."

"Some savior you are. I put my whole life in your hands. I'll pass tomorrow's spelling quiz and everything. But you, my best friend who’s supposed to fix the world just now tell me that complaining won't work and will probably get me switched."

"You're complaining again."

"Oh yeah," Faith said.

"Before you go home, I need to tell you something."

To avoid Lacy Dawn's father working in the driveway, Faith slid down the bank to the dirt road. Her butt became too muddy to reenter the clubhouse regardless of need. Lacy Dawn stayed in the yard, pulled the tarp taut over the cardboard, and waited for Faith to respond.

"I don't need no more encouragement. I'll pass the spelling quiz tomorrow just for you, but I may miss armadillo for fun. Our teacher deserves it," Faith said.

"That joke's too childish. She won't laugh. Besides, dildos are serious business since she ain't got no husband no more. Make 100%. That's what I want."

"Okay. See you tomorrow." Faith took a step up the road.

"Wait. I want to tell you something. I've got another best friend. That's how I got so smart. He teaches me stuff."

"A boy? You've got a boyfriend?"

"Not exactly," Lacy Dawn put a finger over her lips to silence Faith. Her father was hooking up a battery charger. She slid down the bank, too.

He probably couldn’t hear us, but why take the chance.

A minute later, hand in hand, they walked the road toward Faith's house.

"Did you let him see your panties?" Faith asked.

"No. I ain't got no good pair. Besides, he don't like me that way. He's like a friend who's a teacher -- not a boyfriend. I just wanted you to know that I get extra help learning stuff."

"Where's he live?"

Lacy Dawn pointed to the sky with her free hand.

"Jesus is everybody's friend," Faith said.

"It ain't Jesus, you moron," Lacy Dawn turned around to walk home. “His name’s DotCom and….”

Her mother watched from the middle of the road until both children were safe.
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Fiona



Joined: 10 Feb 2013
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2013 10:32 pm    Post subject:

You said you are a psychotherapist and a survivor...have you felt overwhelmed by countertransference before, in response to clients triggering thoughts about your own past trauma? I am a counseling student right now and I wrote a poem out of distress over a reading from my Counseling Profession and Identity class, which said our clients will remind us of our own painful experiences over and over, and even healed, "dealt with"/"worked through" wounds can be reopened. What is your experience of this as a "wounded healer"? I am very nervous about the pain my future in this profession holds for me. I posted the poem in the Poetry thread: hllp*://www.ascasupport.org/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=798
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robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 5:21 am    Post subject: Empathy Replaces Triggers

I like your poem.

The more accomplished that one get in managing empathy, the least likely you are to become overwhelmed. In forty years of practice, I've shed tears five or six times, only once that was noticed by the child. My "trick" is to define their pain as my own and to absorb, process, and dismiss that energy into the environment, so large that it doesn't even notice the contribution. Once you've done it a few times, it becomes quite easy since there is so much pain in our natural environment to attract a little more, like a magnet. It becomes automatic.

While personal experiences can be turned into an advantage, my advice is not to enter the field if your motivation is to solve your own problems. Such always backfires and results in incompetence disguised by degrees and certifications. Trust your clients. They will tell you if you are good or bad at your job, but don't just trust their feelings alone because it is their functioning that the true measure. Your job will not be to just facilitate a person to "feel" better -- you might as well be dealing drugs. Your job is to improve functioning, only one part of which depends on feeling better.

BTW, Rarity from the Hollow is supposed to be free for a couple of days, but since it's so cheap as an ebook anyway it is no big deal. You could learn a lot from Lacy Dawn, the protagonist.
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Fiona



Joined: 10 Feb 2013
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 7:24 am    Post subject: Self-disclosure

Ok, so I have a question for you about self-disclosure. This reply was posted to my poem about wounded healers:

I always wondered the same thing when I talk to my therapist. She had a troubled childhood as well and through some of the things she tells me, in a way makes me feel like this person...this one person I've decided to spew my emotional guts out on, where I sometimes feel embarrassed about most of the things I say...this person makes me feel more comfortable to talk with because she has been through abuse. And I dont know how she does it. I think the line has to be drawn where you don't want to "take the pain" of those you're healing or "walk" for them, because you have your own pain, but just walk along side of them and help them learn how to crawl first, and show them how you began your journey to being able to "walk" again. I think the best healers are those who have been there. I was very scared when going into therapy...I always pictured a cold room, with someone who is just really uninterested.....but luckily I found someone who I can trust with this crap...who suggests ways of healing, but doesn't push, who guides me at the pace I am ready for. I always found that teaching in any aspect helps you learn for yourself as well, and I think you will find that helping others as a counselor, even though it may open old wounds sometimes, may just help give you insight on yourself in the end :)

This is the reply I wrote:

Wow, you're lucky your therapist let you know that about herself. When I asked my therapist if she had ever experienced abuse, she refused to tell me one way or the other. That is what we have learned in school, not to tell personal stuff to your clients, especially not the deepest stuff like abuse and mental illness. We can hint in general that we understand what it is like to go through a very difficult, painful thing, and maaaaaybe even hint that we have some knowledge of what the client is talking about, but no overt disclosures. I know this, but I pleaded with my therapist to tell me, because it would have meant to much to me and been so helpful and therapeutic if I knew she did understand what I was going through, and I wouldn't have trusted her ability to help me any less if she hadn't. So I am curious how your therapist told you this about herself. Under what circumstances? What were you talking about before? What did you say to her that prompted her to tell you this? What was your reaction to finding this out about her? Did it simply make you feel understood, or did you also feel a desire to comfort her or be careful of her feelings? I need to decide what to do myself if a client ever asks me with the same conviction and need what I asked my therapist.

What do you think about the kind of self-disclosure the other commenter was talking about that her therapist did, and how it helped her? What do you think of the kind I pleaded for from my therapist because it would have been so helpful to me and was denied? Do you ever self-disclose to help your clients feel more understood? Even if you don't, do you think there are situations where such disclosure (not to help oneself work stuff out, but to help the client) would be therapeutic and appropriate?
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robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 4:44 pm    Post subject: I'm 64 and It Hit Me Hard for the Very First Time

I don't know what happened. Maybe it was one too many stories. Maybe it was reminiscing as I face medical issues. For the first time in my life I experienced night terrors and bad dreams about my traumas. I even went to a psychiatrist, another first as I've never received any treatment. I think if made my anxiety worse - telling him my story. I've retired early, although I'm broke, to work on the sequel to [u]Rarity from the Hollow[/u], [u]Ivy[/u]. It's so much easier to tell one's story vicariously.

Following is the most recent review of my novel as published on the named blog. My writing was compared to Vonnegut!!

A Universe On the Edge
RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW. Robert Eggleton. Doghorn Publishing. Published 2012.

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

Rarity From The Hollow is written in a simple declarative style that’s well- suited to the imaginary diary of a desperate but intelligent eleven-year-old – the story bumping joyfully between the extraordinary and the banal.

The central planet of the universe is a vast shopping mall, and Lacy Dawn must save her world from a menace that arrives in the form of a cockroach infestation. Look again and the space alien has made Daddy smart and happy – or at least an eleven year old girl’s notion of what a smart and happy man should be. He has also made Mommy beautiful, giving her false teeth and getting the food stamp lady off her back.

About the only thing in the book that is believable is the nature of the narrative voice, and it is utterly compelling. You find yourself convinced that “Hollow” was written as a diary-based autobiography by a young girl and the banal stems from the limits of her environment, the extraordinary from her megalomania. And that’s what gives Rarity From The Hollow a chilling, engaging verisimilitude that deftly feeds on both the utter absurdity of the characters’ motivations and on the progression of the plot.

Indeed, there are moments of utter darkness: In one sequence, Lacy Dawn remarks matter-of-factly that a classmate was whipped to death, and notes that the assailant, the girl’s father, had to change his underpants afterward because they were soiled with semen. Odd, and often chilling notes, abound.

As I was reading it, I remembered when I first read Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle” at the age of 14. A veteran of Swift, Heller, and Frederick Brown, I understood absurdist humour in satire, but Vonnegut took that understanding and turned it on its ear.

In the spirit of Vonnegut, Eggleton (a psychotherapist focused on the adolescent patient) takes the genre and gives it another quarter turn. A lot of people hated Vonnegut, saying he didn’t know the rules of good writing. But that wasn’t true. Vonnegut knew the rules quite well, he just chose to ignore them, and that is what is happening in Eggleton’s novel, as well.

Not everyone will like Rarity From The Hollow. Nonetheless, it should not be ignored.

by Bryan Zepp Jamieson

hllp*://www.*.con/Rarity-Hollow-Robert-Eggleton-ebook/dp/B007JDI508

[/u]
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robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 4:44 pm    Post subject: I'm 64 and It Hit Me Hard for the Very First Time

I don't know what happened. Maybe it was one too many stories. Maybe it was reminiscing as I face medical issues. For the first time in my life I experienced night terrors and bad dreams about my traumas. I even went to a psychiatrist, another first as I've never received any treatment. I think if made my anxiety worse - telling him my story. I've retired early, although I'm broke, to work on the sequel to [u]Rarity from the Hollow[/u], [u]Ivy[/u]. It's so much easier to tell one's story vicariously.

Following is the most recent review of my novel as published on the named blog. My writing was compared to Vonnegut!!

A Universe On the Edge
RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW. Robert Eggleton. Doghorn Publishing. Published 2012.

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

Rarity From The Hollow is written in a simple declarative style that’s well- suited to the imaginary diary of a desperate but intelligent eleven-year-old – the story bumping joyfully between the extraordinary and the banal.

The central planet of the universe is a vast shopping mall, and Lacy Dawn must save her world from a menace that arrives in the form of a cockroach infestation. Look again and the space alien has made Daddy smart and happy – or at least an eleven year old girl’s notion of what a smart and happy man should be. He has also made Mommy beautiful, giving her false teeth and getting the food stamp lady off her back.

About the only thing in the book that is believable is the nature of the narrative voice, and it is utterly compelling. You find yourself convinced that “Hollow” was written as a diary-based autobiography by a young girl and the banal stems from the limits of her environment, the extraordinary from her megalomania. And that’s what gives Rarity From The Hollow a chilling, engaging verisimilitude that deftly feeds on both the utter absurdity of the characters’ motivations and on the progression of the plot.

Indeed, there are moments of utter darkness: In one sequence, Lacy Dawn remarks matter-of-factly that a classmate was whipped to death, and notes that the assailant, the girl’s father, had to change his underpants afterward because they were soiled with semen. Odd, and often chilling notes, abound.

As I was reading it, I remembered when I first read Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle” at the age of 14. A veteran of Swift, Heller, and Frederick Brown, I understood absurdist humour in satire, but Vonnegut took that understanding and turned it on its ear.

In the spirit of Vonnegut, Eggleton (a psychotherapist focused on the adolescent patient) takes the genre and gives it another quarter turn. A lot of people hated Vonnegut, saying he didn’t know the rules of good writing. But that wasn’t true. Vonnegut knew the rules quite well, he just chose to ignore them, and that is what is happening in Eggleton’s novel, as well.

Not everyone will like Rarity From The Hollow. Nonetheless, it should not be ignored.

by Bryan Zepp Jamieson
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robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 4:45 pm    Post subject: I'm 64 and It Hit Me Hard for the Very First Time

I don't know what happened. Maybe it was one too many stories. Maybe it was reminiscing as I face medical issues. For the first time in my life I experienced night terrors and bad dreams about my traumas. I even went to a psychiatrist, another first as I've never received any treatment. I think if made my anxiety worse - telling him my story. I've retired early, although I'm broke, to work on the sequel to [u]Rarity from the Hollow[/u], [u]Ivy[/u]. It's so much easier to tell one's story vicariously.

Following is the most recent review of my novel as published on the named blog. My writing was compared to Vonnegut!!

A Universe On the Edge
RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW. Robert Eggleton. Doghorn Publishing. Published 2012.

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

Rarity From The Hollow is written in a simple declarative style that’s well- suited to the imaginary diary of a desperate but intelligent eleven-year-old – the story bumping joyfully between the extraordinary and the banal.

The central planet of the universe is a vast shopping mall, and Lacy Dawn must save her world from a menace that arrives in the form of a cockroach infestation. Look again and the space alien has made Daddy smart and happy – or at least an eleven year old girl’s notion of what a smart and happy man should be. He has also made Mommy beautiful, giving her false teeth and getting the food stamp lady off her back.

About the only thing in the book that is believable is the nature of the narrative voice, and it is utterly compelling. You find yourself convinced that “Hollow” was written as a diary-based autobiography by a young girl and the banal stems from the limits of her environment, the extraordinary from her megalomania. And that’s what gives Rarity From The Hollow a chilling, engaging verisimilitude that deftly feeds on both the utter absurdity of the characters’ motivations and on the progression of the plot.

Indeed, there are moments of utter darkness: In one sequence, Lacy Dawn remarks matter-of-factly that a classmate was whipped to death, and notes that the assailant, the girl’s father, had to change his underpants afterward because they were soiled with semen. Odd, and often chilling notes, abound.

As I was reading it, I remembered when I first read Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle” at the age of 14. A veteran of Swift, Heller, and Frederick Brown, I understood absurdist humour in satire, but Vonnegut took that understanding and turned it on its ear.

In the spirit of Vonnegut, Eggleton (a psychotherapist focused on the adolescent patient) takes the genre and gives it another quarter turn. A lot of people hated Vonnegut, saying he didn’t know the rules of good writing. But that wasn’t true. Vonnegut knew the rules quite well, he just chose to ignore them, and that is what is happening in Eggleton’s novel, as well.

Not everyone will like Rarity From The Hollow. Nonetheless, it should not be ignored.

by Bryan Zepp Jamieson
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robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 4:47 pm    Post subject: I'm 64 and It Hit Me Hard for the Very First Time

I don't know what happened. Maybe it was one too many stories. Maybe it was reminiscing as I face medical issues. For the first time in my life I experienced night terrors and bad dreams about my traumas. I even went to a psychiatrist, another first as I've never received any treatment. I think if made my anxiety worse - telling him my story. I've retired early, although I'm broke, to work on the sequel to [u]Rarity from the Hollow[/u], [u]Ivy[/u]. It's so much easier to tell one's story vicariously.

Following is the most recent review of my novel as published on the named blog. My writing was compared to Vonnegut!!

A Universe On the Edge
RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW. Robert Eggleton. Doghorn Publishing. Published 2012.

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

Rarity From The Hollow is written in a simple declarative style that’s well- suited to the imaginary diary of a desperate but intelligent eleven-year-old – the story bumping joyfully between the extraordinary and the banal.

The central planet of the universe is a vast shopping mall, and Lacy Dawn must save her world from a menace that arrives in the form of a cockroach infestation. Look again and the space alien has made Daddy smart and happy – or at least an eleven year old girl’s notion of what a smart and happy man should be. He has also made Mommy beautiful, giving her false teeth and getting the food stamp lady off her back.

About the only thing in the book that is believable is the nature of the narrative voice, and it is utterly compelling. You find yourself convinced that “Hollow” was written as a diary-based autobiography by a young girl and the banal stems from the limits of her environment, the extraordinary from her megalomania. And that’s what gives Rarity From The Hollow a chilling, engaging verisimilitude that deftly feeds on both the utter absurdity of the characters’ motivations and on the progression of the plot.

Indeed, there are moments of utter darkness: In one sequence, Lacy Dawn remarks matter-of-factly that a classmate was whipped to death, and notes that the assailant, the girl’s father, had to change his underpants afterward because they were soiled with semen. Odd, and often chilling notes, abound.

As I was reading it, I remembered when I first read Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle” at the age of 14. A veteran of Swift, Heller, and Frederick Brown, I understood absurdist humour in satire, but Vonnegut took that understanding and turned it on its ear.

In the spirit of Vonnegut, Eggleton (a psychotherapist focused on the adolescent patient) takes the genre and gives it another quarter turn. A lot of people hated Vonnegut, saying he didn’t know the rules of good writing. But that wasn’t true. Vonnegut knew the rules quite well, he just chose to ignore them, and that is what is happening in Eggleton’s novel, as well.

Not everyone will like Rarity From The Hollow. Nonetheless, it should not be ignored.

by Bryan Zepp Jamieson
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robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 4:48 pm    Post subject: I'm 64 and It Hit Me Hard for the Very First Time

I don't know what happened. Maybe it was one too many stories. Maybe it was reminiscing as I face medical issues. For the first time in my life I experienced night terrors and bad dreams about my traumas. I even went to a psychiatrist, another first as I've never received any treatment. I think if made my anxiety worse - telling him my story. I've retired early, although I'm broke, to work on the sequel to [u]Rarity from the Hollow[/u], [u]Ivy[/u]. It's so much easier to tell one's story vicariously.

Following is the most recent review of my novel as published on the named blog. My writing was compared to Vonnegut!!

A Universe On the Edge
RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW. Robert Eggleton. Doghorn Publishing. Published 2012.

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

Rarity From The Hollow is written in a simple declarative style that’s well- suited to the imaginary diary of a desperate but intelligent eleven-year-old – the story bumping joyfully between the extraordinary and the banal.

The central planet of the universe is a vast shopping mall, and Lacy Dawn must save her world from a menace that arrives in the form of a cockroach infestation. Look again and the space alien has made Daddy smart and happy – or at least an eleven year old girl’s notion of what a smart and happy man should be. He has also made Mommy beautiful, giving her false teeth and getting the food stamp lady off her back.

About the only thing in the book that is believable is the nature of the narrative voice, and it is utterly compelling. You find yourself convinced that “Hollow” was written as a diary-based autobiography by a young girl and the banal stems from the limits of her environment, the extraordinary from her megalomania. And that’s what gives Rarity From The Hollow a chilling, engaging verisimilitude that deftly feeds on both the utter absurdity of the characters’ motivations and on the progression of the plot.

Indeed, there are moments of utter darkness: In one sequence, Lacy Dawn remarks matter-of-factly that a classmate was whipped to death, and notes that the assailant, the girl’s father, had to change his underpants afterward because they were soiled with semen. Odd, and often chilling notes, abound.

As I was reading it, I remembered when I first read Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle” at the age of 14. A veteran of Swift, Heller, and Frederick Brown, I understood absurdist humour in satire, but Vonnegut took that understanding and turned it on its ear.

In the spirit of Vonnegut, Eggleton (a psychotherapist focused on the adolescent patient) takes the genre and gives it another quarter turn. A lot of people hated Vonnegut, saying he didn’t know the rules of good writing. But that wasn’t true. Vonnegut knew the rules quite well, he just chose to ignore them, and that is what is happening in Eggleton’s novel, as well.

Not everyone will like Rarity From The Hollow. Nonetheless, it should not be ignored.

by Bryan Zepp Jamieson
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View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 4:49 pm    Post subject: I'm 64 and It Hit Me Hard for the Very First Time

I don't know what happened. For the first time in my life I experienced night terrors and bad dreams about my traumas. I even went to a psychiatrist, another first as I've never received any treatment. I think if made my anxiety worse - telling him my story. I've retired early, although I'm broke, to work on the sequel to [u]Rarity from the Hollow[/u], [u]Ivy[/u]. It's so much easier to tell one's story vicariously.

Following is the most recent review of my novel as published on the named blog. My writing was compared to Vonnegut!!

A Universe On the Edge
RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW. Robert Eggleton. Doghorn Publishing. Published 2012.

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

Rarity From The Hollow is written in a simple declarative style that’s well- suited to the imaginary diary of a desperate but intelligent eleven-year-old – the story bumping joyfully between the extraordinary and the banal.

The central planet of the universe is a vast shopping mall, and Lacy Dawn must save her world from a menace that arrives in the form of a cockroach infestation. Look again and the space alien has made Daddy smart and happy – or at least an eleven year old girl’s notion of what a smart and happy man should be. He has also made Mommy beautiful, giving her false teeth and getting the food stamp lady off her back.

About the only thing in the book that is believable is the nature of the narrative voice, and it is utterly compelling. You find yourself convinced that “Hollow” was written as a diary-based autobiography by a young girl and the banal stems from the limits of her environment, the extraordinary from her megalomania. And that’s what gives Rarity From The Hollow a chilling, engaging verisimilitude that deftly feeds on both the utter absurdity of the characters’ motivations and on the progression of the plot.

Indeed, there are moments of utter darkness: In one sequence, Lacy Dawn remarks matter-of-factly that a classmate was whipped to death, and notes that the assailant, the girl’s father, had to change his underpants afterward because they were soiled with semen. Odd, and often chilling notes, abound.

As I was reading it, I remembered when I first read Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle” at the age of 14. A veteran of Swift, Heller, and Frederick Brown, I understood absurdist humour in satire, but Vonnegut took that understanding and turned it on its ear.

In the spirit of Vonnegut, Eggleton (a psychotherapist focused on the adolescent patient) takes the genre and gives it another quarter turn. A lot of people hated Vonnegut, saying he didn’t know the rules of good writing. But that wasn’t true. Vonnegut knew the rules quite well, he just chose to ignore them, and that is what is happening in Eggleton’s novel, as well.

Not everyone will like Rarity From The Hollow. Nonetheless, it should not be ignored.

by Bryan Zepp Jamieson
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View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 4:50 pm    Post subject: I'm 64 and It Hit Me Hard for the Very First Time

I don't know what happened. I experienced night terrors and bad dreams about my traumas. I went to a psychiatrist. I think if made my anxiety worse - telling him my story. I've retired early, although I'm broke, to work on the sequel to [u]Rarity from the Hollow[/u], [u]Ivy[/u]. It's so much easier to tell one's story vicariously.

Following is the most recent review of my novel as published on the named blog. My writing was compared to Vonnegut!!

A Universe On the Edge
RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW. Robert Eggleton. Doghorn Publishing. Published 2012.

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

Rarity From The Hollow is written in a simple declarative style that’s well- suited to the imaginary diary of a desperate but intelligent eleven-year-old – the story bumping joyfully between the extraordinary and the banal.

The central planet of the universe is a vast shopping mall, and Lacy Dawn must save her world from a menace that arrives in the form of a cockroach infestation. Look again and the space alien has made Daddy smart and happy – or at least an eleven year old girl’s notion of what a smart and happy man should be. He has also made Mommy beautiful, giving her false teeth and getting the food stamp lady off her back.

About the only thing in the book that is believable is the nature of the narrative voice, and it is utterly compelling. You find yourself convinced that “Hollow” was written as a diary-based autobiography by a young girl and the banal stems from the limits of her environment, the extraordinary from her megalomania. And that’s what gives Rarity From The Hollow a chilling, engaging verisimilitude that deftly feeds on both the utter absurdity of the characters’ motivations and on the progression of the plot.

Indeed, there are moments of utter darkness: In one sequence, Lacy Dawn remarks matter-of-factly that a classmate was whipped to death, and notes that the assailant, the girl’s father, had to change his underpants afterward because they were soiled with semen. Odd, and often chilling notes, abound.

As I was reading it, I remembered when I first read Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle” at the age of 14. A veteran of Swift, Heller, and Frederick Brown, I understood absurdist humour in satire, but Vonnegut took that understanding and turned it on its ear.

In the spirit of Vonnegut, Eggleton (a psychotherapist focused on the adolescent patient) takes the genre and gives it another quarter turn. A lot of people hated Vonnegut, saying he didn’t know the rules of good writing. But that wasn’t true. Vonnegut knew the rules quite well, he just chose to ignore them, and that is what is happening in Eggleton’s novel, as well.

Not everyone will like Rarity From The Hollow. Nonetheless, it should not be ignored.

by Bryan Zepp Jamieson
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2015 4:51 pm    Post subject: I'm 64 and It Hit Me Hard for the Very First Time

I don't know what happened. I experienced night terrors about my traumas. I went to a psychiatrist. I think if made my anxiety worse. I've retired early, although I'm broke, to work on the sequel to [u]Rarity from the Hollow[/u], [u]Ivy[/u]. It's so much easier to tell one's story vicariously.

Following is the most recent review of my novel as published on the named blog. My writing was compared to Vonnegut!!

A Universe On the Edge
RARITY FROM THE HOLLOW. Robert Eggleton. Doghorn Publishing. Published 2012.

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

Rarity From The Hollow is written in a simple declarative style that’s well- suited to the imaginary diary of a desperate but intelligent eleven-year-old – the story bumping joyfully between the extraordinary and the banal.

The central planet of the universe is a vast shopping mall, and Lacy Dawn must save her world from a menace that arrives in the form of a cockroach infestation. Look again and the space alien has made Daddy smart and happy – or at least an eleven year old girl’s notion of what a smart and happy man should be. He has also made Mommy beautiful, giving her false teeth and getting the food stamp lady off her back.

About the only thing in the book that is believable is the nature of the narrative voice, and it is utterly compelling. You find yourself convinced that “Hollow” was written as a diary-based autobiography by a young girl and the banal stems from the limits of her environment, the extraordinary from her megalomania. And that’s what gives Rarity From The Hollow a chilling, engaging verisimilitude that deftly feeds on both the utter absurdity of the characters’ motivations and on the progression of the plot.

Indeed, there are moments of utter darkness: In one sequence, Lacy Dawn remarks matter-of-factly that a classmate was whipped to death, and notes that the assailant, the girl’s father, had to change his underpants afterward because they were soiled with semen. Odd, and often chilling notes, abound.

As I was reading it, I remembered when I first read Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle” at the age of 14. A veteran of Swift, Heller, and Frederick Brown, I understood absurdist humour in satire, but Vonnegut took that understanding and turned it on its ear.

In the spirit of Vonnegut, Eggleton (a psychotherapist focused on the adolescent patient) takes the genre and gives it another quarter turn. A lot of people hated Vonnegut, saying he didn’t know the rules of good writing. But that wasn’t true. Vonnegut knew the rules quite well, he just chose to ignore them, and that is what is happening in Eggleton’s novel, as well.

Not everyone will like Rarity From The Hollow. Nonetheless, it should not be ignored.

by Bryan Zepp Jamieson
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
robert eggleton



Joined: 17 Mar 2012
Posts: 14
Location: charleston, wv

PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2016 10:03 pm    Post subject: Four Book Reviewers of Rarity from the Hollow Disclosed

Four prominent book reviewers of Rarity from the Hollow privately disclosed that they had been victimized as children. All four wrote glowing book reviews but also cautioned about prospective triggers. One of these book reviewers publicly disclosed for the first time that she was a survivor of rape. With her permission, the review is reprinted below:

Book Review: Rarity from the Hollow
November 23, 2015 Kylie Jude, Science Fiction

"When Robert Eggleton sent me a copy of his book Rarity from the Hollow, I quickly started reading (or rather, slowly, since I’m so busy with my own books and other projects), and soon I found myself immersed in the bizarre world he had created. Soon I was running through the woods with little Lacy Dawn, talking to trees and ghosts. Soon I was weeping for the victim and standing up to the oppressor. Soon I was finding solace and healing in the power of love, laughing at the often comical thoughts and interactions between characters, and marveling at ancient alien encounters and present day journeys to other worlds.

As a rape survivor and country girl (lately at least) who loves (and writes) Science Fiction, I found myself relating easily to Lacy Dawn and her story. The insight Eggleton gives into not just the main character’s thoughts but those of every single character, while a bit confusing and redundant at times, adds to this feeling of immersion. It is unique, as is the combination of such different themes, as well as his style of writing which I would describe as beautifully honest.

Rarity from the Hollow is different from anything I have ever read, and in today’s world of cookie-cutter cloned books, that’s pretty refreshing. While there are a few small grammatical and pacing issues, the “rarity” of this book overshadows all of that as it pulls you into Lacy Dawn’s whimsical and endearing world of Appalachian Science Fiction, taking you on a wild ride you won’t soon forget."

hllp*://*.con/2015/11/book-review-rarity-from-the-hollow/
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